IHME in the news

Read what major media outlets are saying about our work.
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Climate patterns increase air pollution deaths by 14%

The ambitious study looked at air pollution on a global scale, across a 40 year period using NASA satellite data and incidences of premature death linked to air pollution from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in the US.

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Calls to end tax on healthy food

[The risk factors] are among the main determinants of the loss of years of healthy life among Portuguese people.

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How long will we live in future?

According to new GBD 2021 data, life expectancy is expected to increase by almost five years around the world by 2050.

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Inside the Global Burden of Disease study

IHME Director Christopher Murray recounts the study's role in shaping global policy and how collaborators overcame COVID.

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Asbestos is finally banned in the US. Here’s why it took so long

The University of Washington–based In­­sti­tute for Health Metrics and Evaluation estimates that as­­best­os caused more than 40,764 worker deaths in 2019 alone; this figure does not include deaths outside industrial settings, such as those of family members exposed to asbestos brought home on a worker’s clothes or shoes.

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How vaccines are a key tool to tackle Antimicrobial Resistance

Recently, IHME published a first estimate of global mortality associated with bacterial pathogens, attributing 7.7 million deaths to 33 bacterial pathogens in 2019, making bacteria the second leading cause of death.

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The ten trillion dollar disease

To quantify the economic cost of Alzheimer’s disease, we have undertaken a comprehensive analysis, drawing on data from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), a leading research organization specializing in analyzing the global burden of diseases, as well as from other organizations and prior studies.

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Covid cut life expectancy by 1.6 years globally, but the leading causes of death haven’t changed since 1990

Each of the regions studied by the report “showed an overall improvement from 1990 and 2021, obscuring the negative effect in the years of the pandemic,” write the GBD 2021 Causes of Death Collaborators, who comprise hundreds of researchers led by Mohsen Naghavi and Kanyin Liane Ong of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.